Happiness, Life, Love, Purpose

The ‘Business’ of Busy-ness….

IMG_3677
People who often say they’re “too busy” or “crazy busy” sound like buzzing busy signals.
And when one starts sounding like an appliance, it makes it hard to connect with him/her.

My reaction to busy signals is much like that of Mindy Kaling, who sees stress as non-conversation:

No one ever wants to hear how stressed out anyone else is, because most of the time everyone is stressed out.
Going on and on in detail about how stressed out one is, isn’t conversation. It’ll never lead anywhere — except making your conversation partner bored, or worse, peeved.

No one is going to say, “Wow, Mindy, you really have it especially bad.
I have heard some stories of stress, but this just takes the cake.”

People who act super busy send the same message, making time spent with them never feel quite whole.

IMG_3672

Interestingly, I find that most people who are legitimately occupied,
with their work, family, art or what-have-you, rarely play the “too busy” card, or go out of their way to make time for meaningful connection exactly because they’ve been busy.

The Meaning Behind “Busy”

When one goes on to other people,
or to oneself, about being so busy,
he/she is often engaging in doublespeak.

Let’s dig a little deeper to translate what one actually means when one is in the habit of saying or acting like he/she is too busy:

I matter.
Being busy means I’m needed and significant in this great big universe. Though going around literally telling people, “I matter!” and expecting some sort of substantive conversation to result would be really weird, I’ll just say “I’m busy!” instead.

I am super-important.
Doling out complaints and explanations about being too busy is the express line to a mini-ego trip.
It’s going beyond “I matter” to “I matter … more than you” despite the fact that nobody ever wants to hear this.

I’m giving you an easy excuse.
This is one of the easiest outs for stuff I don’t want to do.
Alternatively, I’ve spent a lot of time being distracted or stuck, but this excuse allows me to feel okay with it.

I’m afraid.
I keep relentlessly busy because I suffer from FOMO, or fear of missing out. I’m scared that I don’t matter,
that I’m not important, that I’m not needed, so I’m going to spend my time on distracting stuff that doesn’t really matter, that’s not all that important, where I’m not actually needed.

I feel guilty.
There’s fulfilling, meaningful stuff that I actually do want to do but I can rationalize it away instead of confronting challenges or changing direction.

Alternatively, I think being busy is such a valuable quality that I’ll overbook myself to the point where I feel guilty for not getting to everything or for spending time on anything that doesn’t fit into a limited definition of “productive.”

The worship of busy-ness as such a virtue is where the trouble begins, providing the foundation to its indiscriminate use as a front or an excuse.

It’s easy, even enticing, to neglect the importance of filling our time with meaning, thinking instead that we’ll be content with merely filling our time.

IMG_3407
We self-impose these measures of self-worth by looking at quantity instead of quality of activity.

IMG_3675 Break Free

In the children’s book (that every adult should read), The Phantom Tollbooth, the protagonist Milo comes across the frightening, faceless Terrible Trivium, a “demon of petty tasks and worthless jobs, ogre of wasted effort, and monster of habit.”

Milo and his friends fall under his spell, agreeing to perform busy-work like moving a huge pile of sand from one place to another, grain by grain, using a tweezer.
The Terrible Trivium’s explanation for this terrible fate?

If I only do the easy and useless jobs, i’ll never have to worry about the important ones which are so difficult. I just won’t have the time.

For there’s always something to do to keep me from what i really should be doing….

What a scary thought!

So if I find myself feeling frazzled, habitually explaining away things with a busy status, it’s probably time to slow down and pay attention to the important, difficult stuff.

I’ll examine what is keeping me so busy compared to what I really should and want to be doing.

Here are a couple ways I could start:

Track myself.
In the quest to better connect my attention and action, i do an attention audit.

Track my time using a tool like Harvest or a time log spreadsheet. Break down how I spend time on the computer with RescueTime.
Or see how i answer the questions of “What did you get done today?” and “What did you pay attention to today?” over time using iDoneThis.

Change my language.
I like this tip from Laura Vanderkam. Instead of putting things in terms of time and activity, frame them in terms of priority:

Instead of saying “I don’t have time” try saying “it’s not a priority,” and see how that feels.

Often, that’s a perfectly adequate explanation.
I have time to iron my sheets, I just don’t want to.
But other things are harder.

Try it: “I’m not going to edit your résumé, sweetie, because it’s not a priority.”
“I don’t go to the doctor because my health is not a priority.”

If these phrases don’t sit well, that’s the point.

Changing my language reminds me that time is a choice.
If i don’t like how I’m spending an hour, i can choose differently.

IMG_3670
Another thing I could do is to have a clearer handle of my priorities and how i want to spend my energy, changing my definition of “productivity” to encompass those things.

Press pause.
Not only does one need rest and renew, we also have to slow down and pause to acknowledge our feelings, celebrate our accomplishments, and gain some insight.

Brené Brown explains how people stay busy out of habit and fear.
She recommends letting go of “exhaustion as a status symbol and productivity as self-worth” and allowing us to explore what matters:

When we make the transition from crazy-busy to rest, we have to find out what comforts us, what really refuels us, and do that.

We deserve to not just put work away and be in service of someone else.

What’s really meaningful for us?
What do we want to be doing?

Do less and feel more joy.

The opposite of the fear of missing out, as Anil Dash so beautifully wrote, is the joy of missing out.

Pay attention to what’s in front of us and we’ll gain control and find joy.

Being the one in control of what moves me, what I feel obligated by, and what attachments I have to fleeting experiences is not an authority that I’m willing to concede to the arbitrary whims of an app on my mobile phone.

Feel more joy.
Learning how to do less.
Stop spreading myself so thin by saying “no” more, by saying “no” to being busy, and by meaning “yes” more fully… ❤️E.Lyn.

IMG_3402

IMG_3678

Expectation, Happiness, Life, Purpose

“Hope & Cynicism…”

IMG_1958
To live with sincerity in our culture of cynicism is a difficult dance — one that comes easily only to the very young and the very old.
The rest of us are left to tussle with two polarizing forces ripping the psyche asunder by beckoning to it from opposite directions — critical thinking and hope.

Critical thinking without hope is cynicism. Hope without critical thinking is naïveté.

Finding fault and feeling hopeless about improving the situation produces resignation — cynicism is both resignation’s symptom and a futile self-protection mechanism against it.

Blindly believing that everything will work out just fine also produces resignation, for we have no motive to apply ourselves toward making things better.

But in order to survive — both as individuals and as a civilization — and especially in order to thrive, we need the right balance of critical thinking and hope.

IMG_5424
A plant needs water in order to survive, and needs the right amount of water in order to thrive.

Overwater it and it rots with excess. Underwater it and it dries up inside.

I thought about this recently in observing my unease — my seething cauldron of deep disappointment — with an opinion piece commenting on Arianna Huffington’s decision to continue publishing necessary reporting on “what’s not working — political dysfunction, corruption, wrongdoing, etc.” but to begin giving more light to stories that embody the “perseverance, creativity, and grace” of which we humans are capable.

The writer criticizing Huffington’s decision asserted, with ample indignation, that “to privilege happy stories over ‘unhappy’ ones is to present a false view of the world.”

IMG_1962
Let’s consider for a moment the notion of an un-false view of the world — the journalistic ideal of capital-T truth.
Let’s, too, put aside for now Hunter S. Thompson’s rather accurate assertion that the possibility of objectivity is a myth to begin with.

Since the golden age of newspapers in the early 1900s, we’ve endured a century of rampant distortion toward the other extreme — a consistent and systematic privileging of harrowing and heartbreaking “news” as the raw material of the media establishment.

The complaint which a newspaper editor issued in 1923, lamenting the fact that commercial interest rather than journalistic integrity determines what is published as the “news,” could well have been issued today — if anything, the internet has only exacerbated the problem.

As for Huffington, while we can only ever speculate about another person’s motives — for who can peer into the psyche of another and truly see into that person’s private truth? — this I continue to believe: The assumptions people make about the motives of others always reveal a great deal more about the assumers than the assumed-about.

This particular brand of cynicism is especially pronounced when the assumed-about have reached a certain level of success or public recognition.

Take, for instance, an entity like TED — something that began as a small, semi-secret groundswell that was met with only warmth and love in its first few years of opening up to the larger world. And then, as it reached a tipping point of recognition, TED became the target of rather petty and cynical criticism.

Here is an entity that has done nothing more nor less than to insist, over and over, that despite our many imperfections, we are inherently kind and capable and full of goodness — and yet even this isn’t safe from cynicism.

Let’s return, then, to the question of what is true and what is false, and what bearing this question has — if any — on what we call reality.

IMG_1636

The stories that we tell ourselves, whether they be false or true, are always real.
We act out of those stories, reacting to their realness.
William James knew this when he observed: “My experience is what I agree to attend to. Only those items which I notice shape my mind.”

What storytellers do — and this includes journalists and TED and everyone in between who has a point of view and an audience, whatever its size — is help shape our stories of how the world works; at their very best, they can empower our moral imagination to envision how the world could work better.

In other words, they help us mediate between the ideal and the real by cultivating the right balance of critical thinking and hope.

Truth and falsehood belong to this mediation, but it is guided primarily by what we are made to believe is real.

What we need, then, are writers like William Faulkner, who came of age in a brothel, saw humanity at its most depraved, and yet managed to maintain his faith in the human spirit.

In his Nobel Prize acceptance speech, he asserted that the writer’s duty is “to help man endure by lifting his heart.”
In contemporary commercial media, driven by private interest, this responsibility to work in the public interest and for the public good recedes into the background.

And yet I continue to stand with E.B. White, who so memorably asserted that “writers do not merely reflect and interpret life, they inform and shape life”; that the role of the writer is “to lift people up, not lower them down.”

Yes, people sometimes do horrible things, and we can speculate about why they do them until we run out of words and sanity.

But evil only prevails when we mistake it for the norm.

There is so much goodness in the world — all we have to do is remind one another of it, show up for it, and refuse to leave… ❤️E.Lyn

IMG_5702

Expectation, Faith, Life, Love, Purpose

Embracing Brokeness & Hiding our Souls Not…

IMG_7106.JPG
“Wholeness does not mean perfection: it means embracing brokenness as an integral part of life.” – Parker Palmer

“Do not despise your inner world,” philosopher Martha Nussbaum admonished in her reflection on what it takes to live a full life.

“Real self-esteem is an integration of an inner value with things in the world around you,” Anna Deavere Smith wrote in her spectacular letters of advice to young artists.

And yet in a culture where we’re devouring one another’s outward selves with accelerating “aesthetic consumerism” as we scroll through social media feeds, we’re increasingly bedeviled by the rift between private person and public persona, inner world and outward projection.

Afraid that our inner light will be extinguished or our inner darkness exposed, we hide our true identities from each other.
In the process, we become separated from our own souls.

IMG_6855.JPG

We end up living divided lives, so far removed from the truth we hold within that we cannot know the “integrity that comes from being what you are.”

Wholeness does not mean perfection: it means embracing brokenness as an integral part of life.

Knowing this gives me hope that human wholeness — mine, yours, ours — need not be a utopian dream,
if we can use devastation as a seedbed for new life.

As teenagers and young adults,
we learned that self-knowledge counts for little on the road to workplace success.

What counts is the “objective” knowledge that empowers us to manipulate the world.
Ethics, taught in this context, becomes one more arm’s-length study of great thinkers and their thoughts, one more exercise in data collection that fails to inform our hearts.

IMG_3446.JPG

I value ethical standards, of course.
But in a culture like ours — which devalues or dismisses the reality and power of the inner life — ethics too often becomes an external code of conduct, an objective set of rules we are told to follow, a moral exoskeleton we put on hoping to prop ourselves up.

The problem with exoskeletons is simple: we can slip them off as easily as we can don them.

When we understand integrity for what it is, we stop obsessing over codes of conduct and embark on the more demanding journey toward being whole.

Not knowing who or what we are dealing with and feeling unsafe, we hunker down in a psychological foxhole and withhold the investment of our energy, commitment, and gifts…
The perceived incongruity of inner and outer-the inauthenticity that we sense in others, or they in us-constantly undermines our morale, our relationships, and our capacity for good work.

We are cursed with the blessing of consciousness and choice, a two-edged sword that both divides us and can help us become whole.

The divided life may be endemic, but wholeness is always a choice.

What we name it matters little to me, since the origins, nature, and destiny of call-it-what-you-will are forever hidden from us, and no one can credibly claim to know its true name. But that we name it matters a great deal.

For “it” is the objective, ontological reality of selfhood that keeps us from reducing ourselves, or each other, to biological mechanisms, psychological projections, sociological constructs, or raw material to be manufactured into whatever society needs — diminishments of our humanity that constantly threaten the quality of our lives.

Here is the ultimate irony of the divided life: live behind a wall long enough, and the true self you tried to hide from the world disappears from your own view…

IMG_3445.JPG

The wall itself and the world outside it become all that you know .

Eventually, you even forget that the wall is there — and that hidden behind it is someone called “you.”

If we want to create spaces that are safe for the soul, we need to understand why the soul so rarely shows up in everyday life.

Solitude does not necessarily mean living apart from others; rather, it means never living apart from one’s self.

It is not about the absence of other people-it is about being fully present to ourselves, whether or not we are with others.

Community does not necessarily mean living face-to-face with others; rather, it means never losing the awareness that we are connected to each other.

It is not about the presence of other people-
it is about being fully open to the reality of relationship, whether or not we are alone.

❤️E.Lyn

IMG_7979.JPG

Expectation, Life

【Life is Ephemeral & Transient…】- Seneca on Busyness and The Art of Living Wide Rather Than Living Long

IMG_6406.JPG
“The greatest obstacle to living is expectancy, which hangs upon tomorrow and loses today…
The whole future lies in uncertainty: live immediately.”

“How we spend our days,”
Annie Dillard memorably wrote in her soul-stretching meditation on the life of presence,” is, of course,
how we spend our lives.”

And yet most of us spend our days in what Kierkegaard believed to be our greatest source of unhappiness…

A refusal to recognize that,
“busy is a decision” and that presence is infinitely more rewarding than productivity.

I frequently worry that being productive is the surest way to lull ourselves into a trance of passivity and busyness the greatest distraction from living, as we coast through our lives day after day, showing up for our obligations but being absent from our selves, mistaking the doing for the being.

IMG_6291.JPG

Despite a steadily swelling human life expectancy,
these concerns seem more urgent than ever — and yet they are hardly unique to our age.

In fact, they go as far back as the record of human experience and endeavor.
It is unsurprising, then, that the best treatment of the subject is also among the oldest:
Roman philosopher Seneca’s spectacular 2,000-year-old treatise “On the Shortness of Life”— a poignant reminder of what we so deeply intuit yet so easily forget and so chronically fail to put into practice.

Seneca writes:
It is not that we have a short time to live, but that we waste a lot of it.

Life is long enough,
and a sufficiently generous amount has been given to us for the highest achievements if it were all well invested.

But when it is wasted in heedless luxury and spent on no good activity, we are forced at last by death’s final constraint to realize that it has passed away before we knew it was passing.

So it is:
we are not given a short life but we make it short,
and we are not ill-supplied but wasteful of it…
Life is long if you know how to use it.

Millennia before the now-tired adage that “time is money,” Seneca cautions that we fail to treat time as a valuable resource,
even though it is arguably our most precious and least renewable one:

People are frugal in guarding their personal property;
but as soon as it comes to squandering time they are most wasteful of the one thing in which it is right to be stingy.

To those who so squander their time, he offers an unambiguous admonition:

You are living as if destined to live for ever;
your own frailty never occurs to you; you don’t notice how much time has already passed,
but squander it as though you had a full and overflowing supply — though all the while that very day which you are devoting to somebody or something may be your last.

You act like mortals in all that you fear, and like immortals in all that you desire…

How late it is to begin really to live just when life must end!

How stupid to forget our mortality, and put off sensible plans to our fiftieth and sixtieth years,
aiming to begin life from a point at which few have arrived!

IMG_5687.JPG

Nineteen centuries later,
Bertrand Russell, another of humanity’s greatest minds,
lamented rhetorically,
“What will be the good of the conquest of leisure and health,
if no one remembers how to use them?”

But even Seneca, writing in the first century,
saw busyness — that dual demon of distraction and preoccupation — as an addiction that stands in the way of mastering the art of living:

No activity can be successfully pursued by an individual who is preoccupied … since the mind when distracted absorbs nothing deeply,
but rejects everything which is,
so to speak, crammed into it.

Living is the least important activity of the preoccupied man;
yet there is nothing which is harder to learn…

Learning how to live takes a whole life, and, which may surprise you more,
it takes a whole life to learn how to die.

In our habitual compulsion to ensure that the next moment contains what this one lacks, Seneca suggests,
“We manage to become,
as another wise man put it, “accomplished fugitives from ourselves.”

Seneca writes:

Everyone hustles his life along, and is troubled by a longing for the future and weariness of the present.

But the man who …
organises every day as though it were his last,
neither longs for nor fears the next day…

Nothing can be taken from this life, and you can only add to it as if giving to a man who is already full and satisfied food which he does not want but can hold.

So you must not think a man has lived long because he has white hair and wrinkles:
he has not lived long,
just existed long.

Suppose you should think that a man had had a long voyage,
who had been caught in a raging storm as he left harbor,
and carried hither and thither,
driven round and round in a circle by the rage of opposing winds?

He did not have a long voyage, just a long tossing about.

Seneca is particularly skeptical of the double-edged sword of achievement and ambition — something David Foster Wallace would later eloquently censure — which causes us to steep in our cesspool of insecurity, dissatisfaction, and clinging:

It is inevitable that life will be not just very short but very miserable for those who acquire by great toil what they must keep by greater toil.

They achieve what they want laboriously;
they possess what they have achieved anxiously;
and meanwhile they take no account of time that will never more return.

New preoccupations take the place of the old,
hope excites more hope and ambition more ambition.
They do not look for an end to their misery,
but simply change the reason for it.

This, Seneca cautions,
is tenfold more toxic for the soul when one is working for the man,
as it were, and toiling away toward goals laid out by another:

Indeed the state of all who are preoccupied is wretched,
but the most wretched are those who are toiling not even at their own preoccupations,
but must regulate their sleep by another’s,
their walk by another’s pace,
and obey orders in those freest of all things, loving and hating.

If such people want to know how short their lives are,
let them reflect how small a portion is their own.

IMG_6337.JPG

In one particularly prescient aside, Seneca makes a remark that crystallizes what is really at stake when a person asks,
not to mention demands, another’s time — an admonition that applies with poignant precision to the modern malady of incessant meeting requests and the rather violating barrage of People Wanting Things:

All those who call you to themselves draw you away from yourself.

I am always surprised to see some people demanding the time of others and meeting a most obliging response.

Both sides have in view the reason for which the time is asked and neither regards the time itself — as if nothing there is being asked for and nothing given.

They are trifling with life’s most precious commodity,
being deceived because it is an intangible thing,
not open to inspection and therefore reckoned very cheap — in fact, almost without any value.

He suggests that protecting our time is essential self-care,
and the opposite a dangerous form of self-neglect.

Nobody works out the value of time: men use it lavishly as if it cost nothing…

He captures what a perilous form of self-hypnosis our trance of busyness is….

No one will bring back the years; no one will restore you to yourself.

Life will follow the path it began to take, and will neither reverse nor check its course.

It will cause no commotion to remind you of its swiftness,
but glide on quietly.

It will not lengthen itself for a king’s command or a people’s favor.

As it started out on its first day,
so it will run on, nowhere pausing or turning aside.

What will be the outcome?
You have been preoccupied while life hastens on.
Meanwhile death will arrive,
and you have no choice in making yourself available for that.

But even “more idiotic,” to use his unambiguous language,
than keeping ourselves busy is indulging the vice of procrastination — not the productivity-related kind,
but the existential kind,
that limiting longing for certainty and guarantees,
which causes us to obsessively plan and chronically put off pursuing our greatest aspirations and living our greatest truths on the pretext that the future will somehow provide a more favorable backdrop:

Putting things off is the biggest waste of life:
it snatches away each day as it comes, and denies us the present by promising the future.

The greatest obstacle to living is expectancy,
which hangs upon tomorrow and loses today.

You are arranging what lies in Fortune’s control,
and abandoning what lies in yours.

What are you looking at?
To what goal are you straining?

The whole future lies in uncertainty: live immediately.

Seneca reframes this with an apt metaphor:

You must match time’s swiftness with your speed in using it,
and you must drink quickly as though from a rapid stream that will not always flow…

Just as travelers are beguiled by conversation or reading or some profound meditation,
and find they have arrived at their destination before they knew they were approaching it;
so it is with this unceasing and extremely fast-moving journey of life, which waking or sleeping we make at the same pace — the preoccupied become aware of it only when it is over.

Perhaps unsurprisingly,
given his own occupation,
Seneca points to the study of philosophy as the only worthwhile occupation of the mind and spirit — an invaluable teacher that helps us learn how to inhabit ourselves fully in this “brief and transient spell” of existence and expands our short lives sideways,
so that we may live wide rather than long.

He writes:

Of all people only those are at leisure who make time for philosophy,
only those are really alive.

IMG_5685.JPG

For they not only keep a good watch over their own lifetimes,
but they annex every age to theirs.

All the years that have passed before them are added to their own.

Unless we are very ungrateful,
all those distinguished founders of holy creeds were born for us and prepared for us a way of life.

By the toil of others we are led into the presence of things which have been brought from darkness into light.

IMG_7357.JPG

From them you can take whatever you wish:
it will not be their fault if you do not take your fill from them.

What happiness,
what a fine old age awaits the man who has made himself a client of these!

He will have friends whose advice he can ask on the most important or the most trivial matters,
whom he can consult daily about himself,
who will tell him the truth without insulting him and praise him without flattery,
who will offer him a pattern on which to model himself.

Perhaps most poignantly, however, Seneca suggests that philosophy offers a kind of spiritual reparenting to those of us who didn’t win the lottery of existence and didn’t benefit from the kind of nurturing, sound, fully present parenting that is so essential to the cultivation of inner wholeness:

We are in the habit of saying that it was not in our power to choose the parents who were allotted to us,
that they were given to us by chance.

But we can choose whose children we would like to be.

There are households of the noblest intellects: choose the one into which you wish to be adopted, and you will inherit not only their name but their property too.

Nor will this property need to be guarded meanly or grudgingly:
the more it is shared out, the greater it will become.

These will offer you a path to immortality and raise you to a point from which no one is cast down.

This is the only way to prolong mortality — even to convert it to immortality…. ♥️E.Lyn

IMG_6857.PNG

Happiness, Purpose

The Power Of Purpose …✨

IMG_5393-0.JPG
He who has a Why to live can bear any How… – Friedrich Nietzsche –

An excerpt from a fable I once read…

A king once gave his wise men a challenge.

“Create a ring that will make me happy when I am sad.”

The wise men succeeded.
It was a plain ring with an inscription etched into the metal… It read,
“This too shall pass.”

During times of hardship,
the king would notice the inscription.
It would remind him that hardships always pass, even when things seem hopeless.
He would stop worrying and appreciate life rather than spending all his energy trying to fix problems.

But of course, the ring had an opposing effect as well…

Whenever he felt jubilant,
the ring reminded him that joyful circumstances change as well.

“Nothing lasts forever…”

IMG_6142.JPG

One may ask then…
“Wouldn’t persevering & hard work be pointless if nothing lasts forever?”

While there’s truth to the etching on the king’s ring, perhaps there is more to be said…

“While circumstances always pass,
the strength of our will & purpose can endure.
When we choose a purpose for our lives, our steadfast pursuit of that purpose can remain a source of joy in both good times and bad.”

Striving to make life about something worthwhile has done me much good.

Choosing to do so has given me an anchor of strength and joy.

Well, we could even pledge allegiance to a cause that will persist beyond our lives.
Achieving some end is not the goal!

Living life in full pursuit of what I believe in has been my goal.

IMG_5389-0.JPG

For instance, when I have a disagreement with someone who matters in my life, I feel disconnected, hurt, frustrated…
And oftentimes such feelings are disconcerting.

Withal, instead of getting unduly depressed because of the “disconnection” I feel, I keep in mind the words etched on the king’s ring… “This too shall pass.”

“When we choose to love,
it is an act of our will.
Love is an active choice, not just a feeling…

It is something inside of us.
Love is a part of who we are.”

Relationships with family & friends will inevitably have their ups and downs.

During unpleasant times like these,
I would work on my relationship with them instead of letting circumstances of the moment define my happiness.

Focusing on purpose instead of brooding or crying over spilt milk has made me a stronger person…

Being human, naturally I feel hurt of course…
But the power of purpose has made it easier to let go of pain & frustrations…

Forgive… forget… And smile again! 😊

Hugz …❤️E.Lyn

IMG_6177.JPG
IMG_5930-0.JPG

Faith, Gratitude, Happiness

Thank You, Lord… 👼

IMG_5032.JPG
Gratitude Bestows Reverence…
allowing us to encounter everyday epiphanies, those transcendent moments of awe… And changes forever how we experience life and the world.

IMG_5707.JPG
There is calmness to a life lived in gratitude… a quiet joy.

“Our hearts deviseth our ways;
But the Lord directeth our steps.”
(Proverbs 16:9)

With all my heart,
I trust in you, Lord…
You are my all in all.

IMG_5503.PNG